WIT Press


COMMUNITY-BASED TOURISM AND DEVELOPMENT IN THIRD WORLD COUNTRIES: THE CASE OF THE BAMILEKE ZONE OF CAMEROON AND THE INFLUENCE OF TRADITIONAL INSTITUTIONS

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/ST180121

Volume

227

Pages

11

Page Range

117 - 127

Published

2018

Author(s)

TERENCIA NGONO MINDZENG

Abstract

Community-based tourism, a sustainable tourism approach, is widely adopted as a means to improve the living conditions of local communities in Third World countries. One of the main driver that makes community-based tourism a tool for development is its principle of interconnection and action between the endogenous and exogenous forces within the tourism destination. This driving force can bolster community participation, community development and capacity-building. It is the combination of these three aspects that bring about “place revitalisation”. Place revitalisation is paramount to development in the challenging context of Third World countries because it triggers local initiatives and empowerment. However, for the principle of exogenous and endogenous interconnection to be effective, it requires the existence of a well-established endogenous local institution within the host communities as well as a function transfer brought by the tourists and non-governmental institutions who are the exogenous forces to the destination. This paper seeks to assess the relevance of the principle of exogenous and endogenous interconnection to the enhancement of development in Third World countries. The research also examines the influence played by rural traditional institutions in this principle. The case study for this research is the Bamiléké zone, the breeding ground of community-based tourism initiatives in Cameroon, in which local institutions are very active in community development initiatives through community-based tourism.

Keywords

community-based tourism, development, local communities, place revitalisation, Third World countries, traditional institutions