WIT Press


LIGHTING IN CORRIDORS INFLUENCING THE SWITCHING ON OF ELECTRIC LIGHTING IN CLASSROOMS: NEED FOR EDUCATIONAL ACTIONS

Price

Free (open access)

Volume

195

Pages

11

Page Range

103 - 113

Published

2020

Paper DOI

10.2495/ARC200081

Copyright

Author(s)

AMERICO H. HARA, FERNANDO O. R. PEREIRA

Abstract

Studies suggest the lighting conditions in corridors can influence people’s visual perception and, therefore, the use of electric lighting. The objective was to study the occurrence of switching on the electric lighting in classrooms due to the lighting conditions in the corridors and rooms. The methodology consisted of selecting corridors and classrooms that allow measurements of vertical eye illuminance measurements at 1.65 m height in the corridors and in the entrance door, and the registration of the switching on of the electric lighting in the classroom at the beginning of the occupation. For the first experiment (N = 13), the vertical eye illuminance at the corridor was 80 ± 3 lx and at the classroom door with 377 ± 65 lx, the switching on of the electric lighting in the classroom occurred in only 15%. This indicates the switching on of the electric lighting was not significant when the corridor is darker than the classroom. For the second experiment (N = 13), the vertical eye illuminance of the corridor was 4,185 ± 372 lx and, the classroom door was 253 ± 24 lx. Switching on of the electric lighting occurred in 54%. There was significant activation when the corridor was brighter than the classroom. The third experiment (N = 13) followed the same proposal as the second one, but with higher vertical eye illuminance values, where the corridor was 6,853 ± 1,203 lx and at the classroom door, 880 ± 75 lx, the switching on of the lighting was 38%. The results show that even if the classroom is sufficiently light, the switching on of the electric lighting occurred. Our conclusions describe that lighting in corridors greatly impact the perception of light in the classroom and interfere the switching on of the electric lighting, even with sufficient illuminance in classrooms, showing the need for education programs on energy efficiency and sustainability.

Keywords

user attitude, electric lighting, vertical eye illuminance, corridor, classroom