WIT Press


Damage Simulation For The Disaster Merit Of Light Substances

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/SU100031

Volume

113

Pages

11

Page Range

27 - 37

Published

2010

Size

578 kb

Author(s)

P. Brož

Abstract

In general, dynamic failures of metal construction embrace a large variety of plastic strain rates. These influences must be taken via viscoplasticity, coupled with damage. For this problem two damage models, Gologanu’s and Lemaitre’s, are convenient; they are modified by the Hill potential to take account of material anisotropy. To stipulate the damage parameters of the model concerned, an inverse routine employing the optimizer to correlate the experimental and numerical responses of notched specimen tension tests is applied. This method was used to measure components being composed of the selected material and resulted in suitable values of damaged parameters in an appropriate time for numerical modelling. These quantities come from an optimization method that yields the best solution potential for a variety of possibilities. Both damage models by virtue of the damage mechanics are put on Gologanu’s simulation, which concentrates on the progress of ellipsoidal microvoids in the course of plastic strain, and Lemaitre’s, which applies a comprehensive damage variable that evolves the strain energy density release rate. When elaborating the damage parameter identification method, static and dynamic tests are utilized. The said damage system is used for the aluminium structural component. Keywords: aluminium material, crash failure ductility, ellipsoidal microvoid, failure modelling, finite element codes, high strain rate, inverse technique. 1 Introduction A great saving of weight, and disaster merit protection, is possible merely by the application of modern design intentions and use of lightweight substances, which have restricted ductility and a complicated failure. The failure possibility is thus

Keywords

aluminium material, crash failure ductility, ellipsoidal microvoid, failure modelling, finite element codes, high strain rate, inverse technique