WIT Press

Territorial Functioning, Victimisation And Fear Of Crime: A Comparative Study Of High And Low Crime Rate Estates

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/SPD051322

Volume

84

Pages

10

Published

2005

Size

348 kb

Author(s)

A. Abdullah, A. Bahauddin, B. Mohamed & A. G. Ahmad

Abstract

There is substantial empirical support that links territorial functioning with low crime and fear of crime in the residential setting. However, for the concept to be useful in preventing crime and fear of crime, it is important for it to operate in different crime contexts, especially in high crime areas, where the problem poses a major concern. This study focuses on territorial functioning in outdoor residential settings close to the home such as front and back gardens, porches, pedestrian pathways and immediate streets. Territorial functioning was measured on two dimensions: territorial attitudes and marking behaviour. Based on a survey of 217 respondents, this paper examines territorial functioning in neighbourhoods with different crime levels, focusing mainly on outcomes of crime: victimisation and fear of crime. In accordance with the \“victimisation perspective”, the current study found a significant negative relationship between territorial functioning and victimisation, at the individual and neighbourhood levels, extending the link between high territorial functioning and less crime experience to different crime contexts. The negative relationship between territorial functioning and fear of crime was also observed in the study. Residents who were more territorial were less fearful of going out after dark and felt safer in the streets. However, the link between territorial functioning and less fear of household crime was only confined to elderly residents. Keywords: territorial functioning, fear of crime, victimisation, crime, council estates, Sheffield, residential setting, territorial attitudes, marking behaviour.

Keywords

territorial functioning, fear of crime, victimisation, crime, council estates, Sheffield, residential setting, territorial attitudes, marking behaviour.