WIT Press

Evaluating A New Participatory Planning Approach For Sustainable Landscape Development In Switzerland – Participatory Techniques And Social Effects Of Landscape Development Concepts (LDC)

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/SPD051302

Volume

84

Pages

13

Published

2005

Size

479 kb

Author(s)

C. Höppner, J. Frick, M. Buchecker & H. Elsasser

Abstract

In recent years, the Landscape Development Concept (LDC) has become a popular instrument for sustainable landscape planning on local and regional levels in Switzerland and Germany. In an LDC different participatory techniques are applied to involve stakeholders, authorities, planners and the public. Planners and decision makers involved in the field of sustainability need knowledge of the commonly assumed, but as yet not confirmed social effects of this new planning instruments to identify ways toward a sustained climate of confidence, mutual understanding, cooperativeness as well as the acceptance of sustainable planning projects. In order to provide empirical data on these issues, a mail survey among the project leaders of all completed municipal LDCs in Switzerland was conducted. Results indicate that past LDCs have involved a variety of stakeholders and interests, mostly focusing on ecological dimensions, and that local residents have been insufficiently involved. Among different participatory techniques, interactive techniques to involve directly affected residents were preferred over techniques involving the wider public. LDCs proved to contribute to all investigated social effects. However, acceptance of decisions and implementations was not obtained in all cases. In future, LDCs in Switzerland need to proceed in a more integrative and comprehensive manner in order to take full advantage of this instrument’s potential for a more sustainable landscape development. Keywords: participation, involvement, landscape planning, landscape development concepts, mutual understanding, trust, cooperation, acceptance, social capital.

Keywords

participation, involvement, landscape planning, landscape development concepts, mutual understanding, trust, cooperation, acceptance, social capital.