WIT Press

When The City Invades The Countryside – Cultural-historical Environments In Spatial Planning

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/SPD051252

Volume

84

Pages

10

Published

2005

Size

846 kb

Author(s)

G. B. Jerpåsen & G. Swensen

Abstract

This article focuses on the effects of landscape changes that take place in the outskirts of towns and cities, with special focus on how pressure on land resources affects the preservation of cultural heritage and cultural-historical environments. The effects of modern housing projects and modern road building are significant in these areas. Hereby the traditional structures of farmsteads are diluted, and the historic structures of the landscape are erased. Cultural-historical areas on the suburban fringes have to be protected from fragmentation, and at the municipal planning level there is a growing understanding of the necessity to see wider spatial areas as a planning unity. However, in order to be able to counteract strong forces working in different directions, there is an urgent need to develop long-term strategies for handling cultural-historical environments areas situated on the peripheries of the big cities. Keywords: urban fringe, cultural heritage management, local spatial planning, cultural landscape structure. 1 Introduction This article presents some of the results from the Norwegian research project ”Threatened landscapes – A study of the decision making, legitimacy and practice of cultural heritage management in local planning” [1]. The effects of the landscape changes that take place in the outskirts of towns and cities form the starting point for the discussion. The main focus is on how pressure on land resources affects the preservation of cultural heritage and cultural-historical environments. This pressure comes from several sides: urban development

Keywords

urban fringe, cultural heritage management, local spatial planning,cultural landscape structure.