WIT Press


Meeting An Expanding Human Population’s Needs Whilst Conserving A Threatened Parrot Species In An Urban Environment

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/SC141012

Volume

191

Pages

14

Page Range

1199 - 1212

Published

2014

Size

662 kb

Author(s)

C. J. Groom, P. R. Mawson, J. D. Roberts, N. J. Mitchell

Abstract

The human population of Perth, Western Australia is currently 1.9 million and is predicted to more than double by 2061. The increased housing and infrastructure required to support this population will conflict with the habitat requirements of the Carnaby’s cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus latirostris), a threatened parrot that inhabits the suburbs of Perth outside its breeding season. To understand how this species uses the landscape and identify possible ways to mitigate the impact of future development, we undertook flock follows, assisted by satellite telemetry of 23 birds. The cockatoos have adapted to urban living by using non-native trees for communal night roosting, using artificial water sources, and by relying heavily on exotic food sources. By developing a better understanding of how these cockatoos have adapted to urban habitats we can use a suite of innovative conservation strategies to complement traditional habitat conservation measures. These strategies include urban and landscape planning decisions that consider the specific needs of cockatoos and that involve the community in the conservation of a threatened species.

Keywords

adaptation, urban ecology, Carnaby’s cockatoo, parrot