WIT Press


MOBILITY AND COLLATERAL EFFECTS ON CITY HERITAGE IN AGUASCALIENTES, MEXICO

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/UG180061

Volume

179

Pages

12

Page Range

57 - 68

Published

2018

Size

601 kb

Author(s)

ALEJANDRO ACOSTA COLLAZO

Abstract

Beginning in the third millennium, Mexican cities increased in urban mobility, but it wasn’t until the decade following 2010 that the city of Aguascalientes began rapid growth mobility, dramatically changing its historic centre. Changes in this cultural site have taken place not only in the buildings, but also in daily lifestyles. There is a lack of reliable mobility choices now, yet Aguascalientes is a city far away from designing and building a subway. There is still the chance to promote sustainable urban growth by encouraging the use of less polluting mobility systems, like electric cars and bicycles. Also, Aguascalientes has a lack of parks and bikeways. Moreover, city planning has overlooked having proper zoning in the historic centre; as a result, there are factories, commercial places and museums all mixed up together in the historic quarters. It’s convenient to set a suitable relationship between cultural heritage and increasing mobility. The idea behind studying mobility is to find out how people go to a certain place and to discover new ways to make the process more efficient. Mobility is somehow changing the historic centre. There is a strong link between mobility and the loss of heritage buildings. There’s also a mobility conflict between cultural and commercial activities in the historic centre. The fact is that we are losing cultural advantages by allowing a lot of commercial business to get established in the historic centre. The main consequences of this situation are the building of parking lots and the decay of the population. It is through the identification of parking areas, documentation of flow frequency, the use of historic drawings and historical population data that the loss of this type of architecture could be determined.

Keywords

Aguascalientes, city planning, historic centre, mobility, preservation, transportation, urban growth