WIT Press


CFD ANALYSIS OF LOW FREQUENCY OSCILLATIONS IN NEWTONIAN AND NON-NEWTONIAN FLUIDS IN A VERTICAL PIPE

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/CMEM190041

Volume

125

Pages

12

Page Range

37 - 48

Published

2019

Size

632 kb

Author(s)

MADURANGA AMARATUNGA, HERIMONJA A. RABENJAFIMANANTSOA, RUNE W. TIME

Abstract

The effect of vertically imposed, low frequency oscillations on the rheology of shear-thinning non- Newtonian fluids are studied numerically by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Both Newtonian (water) and inelastic time-independent fluids of power-law (Poly-Anionic Cellulose (PAC)) are used as test fluids. Unsteady state simulations were performed using ANSYS Fluent version 18.0 for a vertical 2-D pipe geometry (ID = 50 mm and H = 850 mm) and sinusoidal, vertical oscillations to the liquid body itself were imposed with a user-defined function (UDF). The multiphase volume of fluid (VOF) method with realizable k-å method was used to impose the turbulence nature of the flow for the cases with water while the cases with non-Newtonian fluids were simulated under the laminar condition. Oscillations of different low frequency values (0.25–5 Hz) and different velocity amplitudes (0.1–0.3 m/s) were tested numerically. The dynamic variation of velocity and shear rate within the oscillated, bulk liquid medium is demonstrated. The flow inside the vertical pipe acts plug like at higher frequencies for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. The air–liquid interface becomes unstable with small disruptive peaks for the cases with water at higher velocity amplitudes while that is very calm for the laminar cases with non-Newtonian fluids. The achieved velocity gradients and the resultant shear rate variation are low with the increased PAC concentration due to the viscous resistance. However, the instantaneous velocity profiles display a progressively more complex structure with increased frequency and velocity amplitude, revealing the presence of alternating upward/downward motion. These alternating velocity profiles confirm the varying shear field present within a drilling pipe at different frequencies and velocity amplitudes while the variation of the shear field is more dependent on the velocity amplitude.

Keywords

frequency, velocity amplitude, displacement amplitude, shear rate, dynamic velocity, Computational Fluid Dynamics