WIT Press


QUALITATIVE ASSESSMENT OF LINKS BETWEEN EXPOSURE TO NOISE AND AIR POLLUTION AND SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/AIR180021

Volume

230

Pages

11

Page Range

15 - 25

Published

2018

Author(s)

JO BARNES, LAURA DE VITO, ENDA HAYES, NÚRIA BLANES GUÀRDIA, JAUME FONS ESTEVE, IRENE VAN KAMP

Abstract

The health impacts of exposure to noise and air pollution are well-documented, however socioeconomic status (SES) can be a determinant in exposure, while at the same time influencing both individual susceptibility and resilience. The scope of the work presented here was undertaken under a specific contract to the European Environment Agency (EEA) to provide an assessment that may be directly incorporated into EEA’s 2018 report exploring the linkages between SES in Europe and exposure to air and noise pollution, as well as to climate-related impacts. More specifically, this research builds on the findings of the 2016 Science for Environment Policy (SEP) report (http://ec.europa.eu/science-environment-policy) and provides an updated qualitative review of the latest evidence and state of knowledge regarding the role of SES in determining exposure, susceptibility and vulnerability to air pollution and noise, documenting research that explores the multiple factors and drivers that can lie behind these linkages. This review has identified and synthesised evidence from a wide range of sources in response to the objectives set by the EEA and covers evidence relating to at least 18 of the EEA-33 countries. The review has identified that there is extensive evidence on the health effects of exposure to noise and air pollution and an increasing body of evidence to suggest that effects may be disproportionately experienced, and even exacerbated by, those in lower SES groups; however, the review also highlights key knowledge gaps, and areas for future research are presented.

Keywords

air pollution, noise pollution, socioeconomic status, health, exposure, environmental justice, vulnerability, EEA, systematic review, rapid evidence review