WIT Press

Amino Acids In Water; A Case Study From The Isle Of Arran, Scotland

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/WP930771

Volume

2

Pages

8

Published

1993

Size

709 kb

Author(s)

G.B. Curry

Abstract

Amino acids in water; a case study from the Isle of Arran, Scotland G.B. Curry DeparZme?^ o/ GeoZogy &W ^pp/zecf GWogy, (77i2i;er^% o/ Glasgow, Lilybank Gardens, Glasgow, G12 8QQ, Scotland, ABSTRACT Amino acids are one of the most abundant constituents of living organisms, are water-soluble, and can survive for long periods of time when released into the environment, e.g. Hare, Hoering and King [1], Curry [2]. Consequently they are a significant component of the biogeochemical cycling of organic molecules. The abundance of 17 common amino acids has been measured in thirteen rivers draining the Goat Fell Granite on the Isle of Arran, Scotland. The distribution pattern of amino acids was very similar in all rivers, although the absolute abundances varied in different rivers. Very similar patterns of amino acid distribution have been recorded in surface water samples from throughout Scotland. The amino acid content of living organisms is different, notably in containing significant

Keywords