WIT Press


"Three Times Is Enemy Action" – Flood Experiences And Flood Perceptions

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/FRIAR120191

Volume

159

Pages

10

Page Range

233 - 242

Published

2012

Size

334 kb

Author(s)

C. B. Rose1, D. G. Proverbs1, C. A. Booth1 & K. I. Manktelow2

Abstract

In the context of anticipated climate change, particularly the frequency and intensity of rainfall events likely to affect the UK in future, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the ways in which people perceive, and therefore respond to, natural hazards such as flood risk. Behavioural models, incorporating key predictive factors, are sought by the policy-making bodies, in order to develop effective interventions for improving community resilience to extreme weather events. An examination of factors relevant to flood risk perception is presented, including the degree of exposure to the threat; concepts such as ‘controllability’ and ‘dread’ associated with different hazards; and the wider issues of perceived responsibility, blame-shifting and ontological security. The complex interactions between the factors, together with some UK-specific issues, pose challenges for the development and testing of any model seeking to explain and predict the behaviour of people in the UK exposed to flood risks. Some innovative techniques, capable of modifying aspects of the perception of risk, which can be incorporated into community engagement initiatives, are also discussed. Keywords: risk perception, flood preparedness, natural disasters, ontological security, community engagement.

Keywords

risk perception, flood preparedness, natural disasters, ontologicalsecurity, community engagement