WIT Press

DOCUMENTATION, RECOGNITION AND PROTECTION OF MODERN FIELD FORTIFICATIONS IN THE CZECH REPUBLIC (CASE STUDY: THE THIRTY YEARS’ WAR)

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/HA-V1-N2-144-152

Volume

Volume 1 (2017), Issue 2

Pages

8

Page Range

144 - 152

Author(s)

V. MATOUšEk

Abstract

In addition to large stable fortifications made of stone or bricks that are listed as national heritage sites, the Czech Republic is home to debris of dozens of smaller field fortifications from early modern times. They are mostly relics of battles and military campaigns associated with the Thirty Years’ War in 1618–1648, a series of shorter wars during the 18th century and the Napoleonic Wars.

So far, only sites from the Thirty Years’ War have been systematically studied and documented, i.e., a total of thirty fortifications found in seven localities. The field fortifications from the 18th to the beginning of the 19th century have only been studied and documented at random, and the total estimated number of sites is 100–150. Locating field fortifications, as well as their description and documentation, is primarily based on research combining cartographic, iconographic and written sources, along with field research (ground research, LIDAR surface screening and scanning). Excavation and experimentally built fortification models (at 1:1 scale) play an important role in our recognition of the construction details. In spite of the long-term research, most of the fortifications are not protected on national heritage lists.

Keywords

Czech Republic, field fortifications, modern era