WIT Press

Paying For Progress: The Utility Of Using Roadspace

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/UT950331

Volume

18

Pages

8

Published

1995

Size

765 kb

Author(s)

J. Dinwoodie

Abstract

A pragmatic perception survey of 271 motorists in Plymouth is used to explore variations in the willingness to pay for varying levels of road tolls and their behavioural impact on car trips into the city. Frequently stated components of utility, revealed as beliefs associated with such trips, included convenience and time, with expense, comfort and reliability less so, and safety, image and pollution least stated. Studies of the beliefs and utilities of consumers of roadspace are essential if tolls are to be optimised. 1. Background The technology and economics of road pricing (RP) have been widely discussed [e.g.1,2,3,4] but not so the utilities and beliefs which consumers associate with the use of roadspace. If the right to do so is traded as a scarce commodity, an optimal economic allocation betwe

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