WIT Press


The Positive Impact Of The Airborne And Special Operations Museum On The Surrounding Civilian Community

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/DSHF120151

Volume

123

Pages

10

Page Range

187 - 196

Published

2012

Size

728 kb

Author(s)

N. Suarez & J. Bartlinski

Abstract

Although the U.S. Army Airborne and Special Operations Museum located in downtown Fayetteville, North Carolina, is a U.S. federal institution tasked with soldier education, it has had a significant impact on the surrounding civilian community. In the past, downtown Fayetteville was known for the bars, massage parlors, and strip clubs frequented by soldiers from nearby Fort Bragg and its high crime rate. As a result, Fayetteville gained the nickname \“Fayettenam” in the 1960s because it was perceived to be as dangerous as Vietnam. Since the establishment of the Airborne and Special Operations Museum in August 2000, Fayetteville has improved its reputation and become a vibrant historic and cultural hub for the region. A number of businesses, cafes, parks, museums, theatres, and other cultural institutions have emerged downtown. There have been efforts for the adaptive re-use and preservation of historic buildings and environmental clean-up in the city. Fayetteville is now known as the \“All American City” due to this renaissance. The Airborne and Special Operations Museum successfully transitioned from military to civilian life by basing itself off of the military installation and within the community. The Museum is a model for other military installations wishing to foster a positive relationship with their communities. Keywords: adaptive re-use, civilian community, environmental clean-up, historic preservation, military museum, urban renewal. 1 Introduction The Airborne and Special Operations Museum (ASOM) in Fayetteville, North Carolina, facilitates a positive relationship between Fort Bragg, a U.S. Army

Keywords

adaptive re-use, civilian community, environmental clean-up, historic preservation, military museum, urban renewal.