WIT Press


The Contribution Of Human Psychology To Disaster Management: Mitigation, Advance Preparedness, Response And Recovery

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/DMAN110181

Volume

119

Pages

14

Page Range

195 - 208

Published

2011

Size

348 kb

Author(s)

C. Percy, Y. F. Chen, A. Bibi, D. Coles-Jordan, E. Dodson, T. Evans, D. Klingberg & M. van der Bruggen

Abstract

This integrative review highlights the potential contribution of human psychology to disaster management, in terms of mitigation, advance preparedness, acute responses to events, and longer term psychosocial effects. The aim is not to conduct a detailed systematic review of the evidence in any one area, but rather to plot out a broad overview of the areas where work has been done, and highlight gaps where there is potential for further development. Keywords: psychology, disaster, mitigation, prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, theory, intervention, behaviour. 1 Introduction It has become convention to consider four distinct stages, i.e. mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery [1]. By the mitigation and prevention phase we refer to activities or perceptions relating to reducing the risks of disasters occurring, for example, to assess of reduce the risk of flooding, or to prevent chemical incidents. By the preparedness phase we mean considering, rehearsing and preparing what to do in the event of a disaster, for example, by conducting drills, exercises, and simulations. The response phase refers to activities and experiences of tackling immediate danger when a disaster occurs, for example, conducting search and rescue, or treating acute physical and psychological trauma. The recovery phase refers to activities and experiences associated with

Keywords

psychology, disaster, mitigation, prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, theory, intervention, behaviour