WIT Press


Two-parameter Concept For Anisotropic Cracked Structures

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/BE070251

Volume

44

Pages

10

Published

2007

Size

405 kb

Author(s)

P. Brož

Abstract

For two-dimensional anisotropic elasticity the M-integral was evolved, in terms of the boundary element method serving for numerical determination of the T stress which represents a notable parameter for fracture evaluation of cracked solid bodies on top of the stress intensity factor. T-stress issues for the crack face pressure instances are employed as the reference solutions to infer weight functions, e.g. to obtain T-stress results for thick-walled cylinders weakened by an internal edge crack subject to any complicated loading. Some examples are demonstrated. Keywords: complex stress distribution, crack face, material anisotropy, remote load, self-regularization. 1 Introduction Besides the stress intensity factor, the T-stress is the other parameter reflected in fracture evaluation. The path-independent M-integral approach to interpret the T-stress, in conformity with Shah et al. [1], is augmented to use plane, in general anisotropic cracked constituents. It is realized in the boundary element method. An example is demonstrated to indicate the accuracy of the quantification formulated and its suitability. The numerical projects derived are illustrative of the fact that material anisotropy has indeed a substantial influence on the T stress. To assess the M integral, conceptions for the stresses and displacements at interior points are required. When being the interior points very close to the boundary, some inconveniences in the standard BEM representation arise. A technique to get over this near-singularity problem was issued as early as

Keywords

complex stress distribution, crack face, material anisotropy, remote load, self-regularization.