WIT Press


Indoor And Outdoor Pollution In Cloth Dyeing: Examples From Textile Studios In Nigeria Tertiary Institutions

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/AIR100281

Volume

136

Pages

8

Page Range

313 - 320

Published

2010

Size

276 kb

Author(s)

D. O. Mákindé, E. T. Ìjísakin & Y. O. Ìjísakin

Abstract

Cloth dyeing has been confirmed to be a major cause of pollution because the dyes used contain some substances which are injurious to humans and their environment. This paper examined cloth dyeing activities in some selected art institutions in Nigeria. The study made use of 50 systematically selected students from the three levels of tertiary institutions in Nigeria. All the institutions surveyed lack adequate studio spaces, ventilation, personal protective equipment, and dye waste drainage required for productive and hazard-free cloth dyeing. It was also discovered that most synthetic dyes used have no user guides. This paper concluded that more dyes need to be studied for hazard identification and prevention. Adequate provision for studio space and amenities should be vigorously pursued and governments should monitor manufacturers of synthetic dyes and chemicals to reduce or eliminate health risks in cloth dyeing. Keywords: hazards, synthetic dyes, cloth dyeing, pollution, art studio, chemicals. tertiary institutions, toxic. 1 Introduction Cloth dyeing is an age long craft tradition among the people of Nigeria [1]. Though it has an obscure and controversial origin, its practice in Nigeria has spanned several decades [2]. In the ancient times traditional dyeing relied heavily on locally sourced materials (dyes and mordant) and indigenous technology [3]. From 1930 onwards the use of synthetic dyes and chemicals (manufactured) replaced the natural dyes (indigo) which are considered slow, laborious and time consuming [4]. Hence, the use of synthetic dyes has continued at cottage and

Keywords

hazards, synthetic dyes, cloth dyeing, pollution, art studio, chemicals. tertiary institutions, toxic