WIT Press


Risk-based Assessment Of Climate Change Impact On Storm Drainage System

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/FRIAR100021

Volume

133

Pages

12

Page Range

13 - 24

Published

2010

Size

1,798 kb

Author(s)

Z. Alsaqqaf, H. Zhang & S. Mohamed

Abstract

Climate change impacts on engineering infrastructures are increasing. The infrastructures are expected to withstand more frequent and severe weather events, more climate variability, and changes in climate norms (average conditions). It is anticipated that many civil infrastructure systems such as storm drainage, will fail to meet the expected environmental pressures. Therefore, it is important to identify current and future risks; to develop strategies for adapting such risks; and to implement an effective maintenance plan. In the study, the climate change impacts on storm drainage were investigated, particularly in Southport, Queensland, Australia. The historical rainfall data for 120 years were analysed to identify the changes in the trends, patterns and frequencies of rainfall. The peak flow in a flooding event was identified. The investigation provides essential information for the vulnerability to risk failure of the existing storm drainage system, such as at a critical pipe failure point. Finally, the research applied a risk-based vulnerability assessment by risk analysis and management quantification tools to quantify the impact that rainfall may induce through storm drainage failure. Keywords: storm drainage, climate change, risk assessment, event tree analysis. 1 Introduction Due to increased and more intense Climate Change (CC), engineering structures are increasingly forced to withstand more frequent and extreme weather events, more climate variability, and changes in climate norms (average conditions). Numerous changes have already occurred, such as the increase in the global mean temperature and the sea level rise. These changes, projected to worsen over time, will impact on civil infrastructure systems, such as storm drainage, in

Keywords

storm drainage, climate change, risk assessment, event tree analysis