WIT Press


Effect Of Recycled Water On The Soil Physical-chemical Properties Of Four Vineyards In Great Western, Victoria, Australia

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/WP080581

Volume

111

Pages

16

Page Range

587 - 602

Published

2008

Size

493 kb

Author(s)

K. Hermon, G. Allinson, P. Maher, F. Stagnitti & R. Armstrong

Abstract

The effect of recycled water on soil physico-chemical properties was investigated in a number of blocks in each of four vineyards in the Great Western wine growing region, comparing soils beneath vines irrigated with recycled water and/or on-farm dam water with undeveloped land in each case. The application of recycled water in Great Western vineyards since 1999 has impacted deleteriously on the properties of topsoils and to a lesser extent on subsoils. These impacts include an increase in soil electrical conductivity (EC) and soil exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP). The data suggests that there is a significant threat to soil structural integrity from use of the recycled water at all sites. There is a comparable threat from some fresh (dam) water resources used in this region. Risks are either as a result of elevated sodium levels coupled with moderate salinity, or as a result of waters with very low salinity. Keywords: recycled water, salinity, soil solute distribution and impact, vineyard sustainability. 1 Introduction The Great Western wine region of western Victoria, fig. 1, was established during the gold rush era of the 1850s. The area of plantings in the region was

Keywords

recycled water, salinity, soil solute distribution and impact, vineyard sustainability.