WIT Press


Removal Of Natural Organic Matter By Conventional And Enhanced Coagulation In Nicaragua

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/WRM070381

Volume

103

Pages

11

Published

2007

Size

635 kb

Author(s)

I. García & L. Moreno

Abstract

Enhanced coagulation was applied to raw water from a drinking water plant in Nicaragua through bench scale jar test in order to reduce the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) and decrease the trihalomethanes (THMs) formation which has been linked to carcinogenic diseases. Due to the lack of information about the presence of chlorination by-products (CBPs) like trihalomethanes, a study of their formation by varying pH, contact time, temperature and chlorine dose was also performed; following conventional or enhanced coagulation treatment. The results show that enhanced coagulation decreases considerably the formation of THMs because it reduces strongly the presence of organic matter due to the fact that higher alum doses were used in comparison with conventional coagulation utilized at the facility. The removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was improved from 44% at the facility to 67% with enhanced coagulation. Trihalomethanes concentration increases drastically when extreme conditions of the four parameters evaluated were applied exceeding the maximum contaminant levels of USEPA (80 µg/L) but not the Nicaraguan target value (460 µg/L) for both coagulation types. Keywords: enhanced coagulation, fulvic acid, humic acid, natural organic matter, SUVA, trihalomethanes.

Keywords

enhanced coagulation, fulvic acid, humic acid, natural organic matter, SUVA, trihalomethanes.