WIT Press


Conservation Strategies For The Green Island Human Rights Memorial Park

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/STR070351

Volume

95

Pages

10

Published

2007

Size

448 kb

Author(s)

H. M. Hsu

Abstract

The Green Island, situated in the south-eastern seas of the mainland of Taiwan, although it is blessed with an abundance of fishery resources thanks to the dynamic Kuroshio regime passing through the nearby seas, remains an insulated island unexplored by the outside world. For its unique natural environment, in 1911, during the Japanese occupation era, it was chosen for building prisons for detaining criminals. Following the Second World War, with the Chiang Kai Shek’s regime retreating to Taiwan, it was once again chosen for building concentration prisons, largely for detaining political dissidents or rebels. It was not until the deregulation of the Marshal Law in 1978 that the Green Island’s prison humanity history witnessed yet another unique humanity heritage in Taiwan’s development history. With Green Island prison facilities becoming dilapidated, where the buildings are at risk of toppling, coupled with a majority of the victims held in the earlier concentration camps growing old, the Council for Cultural Affairs has commissioned a study team to conduct an investigative study on the historic buildings. To explore the landscape of the human rights memorial park and its preservation value, the thesis aims to broach from the perspective of cultural landscape how it encompasses an interactive correlation between humans and the natural environment. With that, this paper emphasizes at discussing how the tangle space evolves along the natural environment, social background, economic criteria, and so forth in anticipation to present a set of conservation strategies for integrating the region’s humanity history and environment. Keywords: the Green Island Human Rights Memorial Park, Taiwan, the concentration camp, conservation strategies, cultural landscape.

Keywords

the Green Island Human Rights Memorial Park, Taiwan, the concentration camp, conservation strategies, cultural landscape.