WIT Press


Structural Serviceability Under Impact And Dynamic Loading

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/SU060451

Volume

87

Pages

8

Published

2006

Size

3,682 kb

Author(s)

A. Farah

Abstract

The behavior of structures relative to the comfort of the human user is an important factor in the design process. A tall building is designed to withstand specified seismic and wind loads, and to remain safe from collapse or life-threatening damage under the maximum load, and to undergo no structural damage or user discomfort when the building is subjected to minor earthquakes or wind actions. Similarly, floors subject to human activity such as walking, jumping, running and dancing should be designed such that the resulting vibrations are not annoying or disturbing to the human occupants. The serviceability of such structures is dependent upon the imposed excitation and the characteristics of the structure such as frequency, mass, stiffness and damping. Thus, in order to ensure that a structure is serviceable, it is desirable to use a serviceability criterion that is based on human response to vibration during the interaction of the human and the vibrating structure. In this paper, the serviceability of floors and tall buildings is assessed in terms of the absorbed power (rate of energy dissipation) through biomechanical models of the human in the vertical and fore-and-aft (horizontal) modes respectively. This quantity has been shown to be a reliable indicator of human response to vibration. The forcing function on tall buildings is estimated from statistical data of past earthquakes or wind actions as represented by the relevant power spectra for the location, and that acting on floors by heel impact and the forcing function during walking or dancing. The results indicate that in the case of tall buildings, absorbed power discerns comfort levels at different floor levels, and in the case of floors, that absorbed power is a good predictor of floor serviceability. Serviceability design curves are presented to enable the designer to arrive at serviceable designs. Keywords: tall buildings, floors, serviceability, human comfort, biomechanical models, seismic loads, wind loads, absorbed power, floor design curves, tall building design curves.

Keywords

tall buildings, floors, serviceability, human comfort, biomechanical models, seismic loads, wind loads, absorbed power, floor design curves, tall building design curves.