WIT Press


VULNERABLE AREAS IN TOURIST CITIES OF COASTAL ZONES: CAMPECHE, MEXICO

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/CC190081

Volume

188

Pages

12

Page Range

83 - 94

Published

2019

Author(s)

BERTHA N. CABRERA SÁNCHEZ, JOEL F. AUDEFROY

Abstract

The expansion of cities located in coastal areas, primarily the emergence of settlements on the periphery of Mexican tourist resorts, makes them increasingly vulnerable in physical and urban terms to a variety of natural phenomena (like extreme precipitation, tropical storms and hurricanes), which can cause disasters for local populations. The coastal zone of Campeche is 425 km long and in the last 30 years has undergone increasingly rapid growth of its population and the urban occupation of its coastline, increasing the number of people that might be affected by weather like hurricanes. This paper focuses on two central aspects: first, identifying vulnerable areas that are threatened by hydro-meteorological hazards; and second, identifying strategies for adapting to such risks, based on the experiences of affected communities. This information supports the hypothesis that empowerment and participation of the people, in conjunction with government strategies, can help reduce the risk of disaster and strengthen the inhabitants’ resilience to hydro-meteorological hazards. We present a case study on the city of Campeche, in the state of Campeche, Mexico; a city popular among tourists, with highly valuable urban spaces rich in material, architectural, cultural and historical heritage. The process of urban growth reproduces and deepens inequalities, which directly affect the inhabitants’ resilience against frequent natural phenomena; but a variety of urban, social, economic and political conditions should be taken into account in determining the strategies for surviving hydro-meteorological hazards.

Keywords

Campeche, coastal cities, Mexico, tourism, vulnerability, risk, marginalization, resilience, hydro-meteorological hazard, safety strategies, weather