WIT Press


Urban Car Sharing: An Overview Of Relocation Strategies

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/UT120361

Volume

128

Pages

13

Page Range

419 - 431

Published

2012

Size

391 kb

Author(s)

E. M. Cepolina & A. Farina

Abstract

Traditional car sharing systems are round trip shared vehicle systems and require advance reservations. The advances of GPS, communication techniques and vehicle automation allow us to improve car-sharing systems and to provide users with greater flexibility. As it concerns reservation, new car sharing systems offer users open-ended reservation and/or instant access. As it concerns the trip topology, new car sharing systems are multiple station shared vehicle systems (MSSVS). Round trips still occur in this type of system; however there are a large number of one-way trips made between the multiple stations. Operating an MSSVS is much more difficult than operating a round trip shared vehicle system. The problem is that the system can quickly become imbalanced with respect to the number of vehicles at the multiple stations. A review of user-based and operator-based relocation strategies is provided in the paper, as well as some details about some new possible car sharing systems, where vehicles are fully automated and can be accessed from any point within the intervention area. Keywords: relocation procedures, operator-based relocation, user-based relocation, vehicles automation, vehicles localization techniques, capillarity. 1 Introduction The earliest origin of shared use vehicle systems is in 1948, in Zurich, which was performed by a cooperative called \“Sefage”. Afterwards, another shared vehicle system, Procotip, was started in 1971 in Montpellier, and Witkar in Amsterdam in 1973. All these experiences have been unsuccessful. However, in the 1980s several other initiatives were launched, such as \“Mobility CarSharing” in Switzerland, and \“Stattauto” in Berlin. With these car sharing systems usually members need to book cars beforehand and the time that the car will be dropped

Keywords

relocation procedures, operator-based relocation, user-based relocation, vehicles automation, vehicles localization techniques, capillarity.