WIT Press


Physicians’ Internet Use: Diffusion Through Compatibility And Observability

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/DATA070241

Volume

38

Pages

9

Published

2007

Size

312 kb

Author(s)

F. Chew & W. Grant

Abstract

A national mail survey of 683 randomly selected US family physicians was conducted using diffusion of innovations theory to assess Internet use perceptions and identify sources from which physicians obtained medical information. Continuing medical education (CME), medical journals and professional colleagues were the top three sources of medical information. Internet use diffused through five starting points and three paths. They are 1) assessing the professional association website as helpful, 2) taking a CME course on Internet navigation or participating in an Internet demonstration, 3) having a teaching hospital affiliation, 4) a lower patient load and 5) recent professional training (within the past 10 years). From here the three pathways included observing its benefits, utilization compatibility and ease, and getting useful information. Continuing medical education with an emphasis on demonstration constitutes the optimal means for socializing family physicians to learn how to navigate the Internet. Keywords: Internet use, family physicians, diffusion. 1 Introduction Family medicine has increasingly become an information-intensive specialty reliant on relevant original research published in many multidisciplinary and subspecialty journals [1]. Therefore, practitioners must be knowledgeable about the best evidence for clinical practice from disease screening to bioterrorism threat response and assisting patients to assess Internet health information. More

Keywords

Internet use, family physicians, diffusion.