WIT Press


A Technique For Measuring The Dynamic Behaviour Of Materials At Elevated Temperatures With A Compressive SHPB

Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/MC050151

Volume

51

Pages

10

Published

2005

Size

775 kb

Author(s)

B. Davoodi, A. Gavrus & E. Ragneau

Abstract

In order to facilitate the characterization of materials at high strain rate and high temperature, this paper introduces a very simple technique for using the traditional Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) system at elevated temperatures, with a different geometry for the specimen. This particular specimen is used to avoid a complicated SHPB system at an elevated temperature, and to keep things as simple as possible. The limitations of the compression SHPB in use at high temperatures, the need for extra computations and the requirement for additional equipment may be reasons why there is such a scarcity of reliable flow stress data for various materials at high temperatures in the literature. In the layout of the high temperature test set up at our laboratory, in addition to the conventional compression SHPB, an induction coil heater is used as the heating system and a simple holder is used to hold the specimen at the correct position during the test. The thermal behaviour of the new specimen will make it possible to bring the cold bars in contact with the heated specimen manually and without using cumbersome mechanisms, increasing the likelihood that the experiments will be successfully carried out at the desired temperatures. This simple, easy, and practical, system has been used to test metallic materials at high temperature and high strain rates. Keywords: Compression Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar, high strain rate testing, elevated temperature, aluminium 5083, dynamic behaviour. 1 Introduction The design of many engineering structures or structural elements when subjected to high strain rate dynamic loading is based on material data, usually in the form

Keywords

Compression Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar, high strain rate testing, elevated temperature, aluminium 5083, dynamic behaviour.