WIT Press


Sustainable development and the great sage-grouse



Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/SAFE-V7-N1-31-40

Volume

Volume 7 (2017), Issue 1

Pages

9

Page Range

31 - 40

Author(s)

DOUGLAS B. RIDEOUT, YU WEI, JOE-RILEY EPPS, DAVID MUELLER & NIKI KERNOHAN

Abstract

The invasion of non-native grasses, pinyon-juniper encroachment, drought and climate change have resulted in larger, more intense fires in the western United States’ sagebrush-steppe ecosystem. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service identified these factors as the primary threat to sagebrush obligate species, particularly the endemic greater sage-grouse. A large portion of primary sage-grouse conservation areas reside on the U.S. Department of the Interior federal lands. In 2015, the DOI issued Secretarial Order 3336 that directed the development of a comprehensive science-based strategy to reduce the threat of large-scale rangeland fires to greater sage-grouse habitat and the sage-steppe ecosystem. This study reports the results of using the STARFire planning and budgeting system to respond to Sec- tion 7(b) iii-Fuels, Action Item #4 of the secretarial order. This study demonstrates the capabilities of STARFire to apply the latest science and technology using a risk-based approach to conduct a wildfire risk analysis and improve the targeting of fuels reduction programs on a landscape-scale study across the Northern Great Basin of the United States.

Keywords

economics, fuel treatment, Great Basin, Landscape analysis, risk, sage-grouse, spatial planning, STARFire, U.S. Bureau of Land Management. wildland fire.