WIT Press


Assessment of adaptability of natural gas vehicles by the constructive analogy method



Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/SDP-V12-N6-1006-1017

Volume

Volume 12 (2017), Issue 6

Pages

11

Page Range

1006 - 1017

Author(s)

I. ANISIMOV, A. IVANOV, E. CHIKISHEV, D. CHAINIKOV, L. REZNIK & A. GAVAEV

Abstract

This research is a comparative assessment of the operation of dual fuel engine vehicles (gas-diesel and diesel cycles) in the context of the fuel’s environmental impact and economy. The influence of air temperature and vehicle load on this process is considered. The theory of constructive analogy as an example of natural gas vehicles is taken into account. The vehicles mentioned above were comparatively analyzed according to their level of adaptability to low ambient temperatures in the context of fuel consumption and exhaust gases emissions.

The regularities of the influence of low ambient temperatures and cargo weight on fuel consumption and the harmful substances emitted with the exhaust gases of natural gas vehicles were determined. In the range of negative air temperatures, the consumption of diesel fuel increased in comparison with a consumption of natural gas to 9%, and at positive temperatures, the consumption of gas increased up to 3%. Decreasing air temperature and cargo weight reduced the mass emissions of soot and the nitro- gen oxide emitted with exhaust gases during operation, both on the diesel and gas-diesel cycles. Soot emissions decreased to 26% and nitrogen oxide to 54%.

The specific emissions of harmful substances emitted with exhaust gases per unit of fuel consumed for vehicles when operating on the gas-diesel cycle (GDC) is 14…33% less than on diesel.

When the ambient temperature falls to −38°C, the vehicle adaptability by fuel consumption when oper- ating on the GDC increases on 6…18% in comparison with a diesel cycle. The vehicles’ adaptability, assessed by harmful substances emitted with exhaust gases, to changes in cargo weight are almost identical.

Keywords

adaptability, fuel consumption, harmful substances emissions, natural gas vehicles variable low ambient temperature conditions.