WIT Press


SUSTAINING PLACE-IDENTITY IN HISTORIC MINING CITIES OF THE US ROCKY MOUNTAIN WEST



Price

Free (open access)

Paper DOI

10.2495/DNE-V8-N4-287-299

Volume

Volume 8 (2013), Issue 4

Pages

12

Page Range

287 - 299

Author(s)

WENDY R. MCCLURE

Abstract

In the case of 19th century mining towns, inherited morphology as exhibited in residual layers of urban (built) fabric provides a tangible connection to authentic mining culture amidst the current era of development and change. This paper will discuss the relative successes of varying approaches to preserving mining-era morphology of two former silver mining towns that have been adapted as bustling downhill skiing and recreational amenity towns. Planning and preservation strategies used to guide development in Park City, Utah, will be compared with policies guiding development in Telluride, Colorado, which enjoys National Landmark status. Each town has taken a different view of its cultural heritage and is guided by different principles concerning adaptation and preservation of inherited context. Philosophical differences inherent to planning policy and preservation guidelines are clearly legible in each community’s respective urban form. Resulting loss of historic continuity and regional identity suggests a need for a deeper interpretation of authenticity than is afforded by most policies guiding community development and historic preservation.

Keywords

Design guidelines authenticity, historic preservation, mining heritage, place-identity, urban morphology